This Father’s Day, let us reflect on men’s health

Dr. David A. Delaney, MDCM, CCFP, FCFP See Bio

Dr. David A. Delaney, MDCM, CCFP, FCFP

Dr. David Delaney is a Family Physician who was born and raised in Quebec City. He is a graduate of McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and he completed his residency in the Family Medicine Department of St. Mary’s Hospital in Montreal. Dr. Delaney is Board Certified in Family Medicine in both Canada and the United States. He is a Fellow in Family Medicine with the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

Dr. Delaney has been practicing medicine since 1996 in Canada as well as the United States. He provides high quality Evidence Based Medicine with an emphasis on Preventive Care. His areas of interest include the care and management of complex medical conditions, adolescent medicine and sports medicine. He has extensive experience working in private practice, caring for his patients in both the community and hospital settings, including the intensive care unit.

In addition to his private practice experience, he was the team physician for Concordia University’s women’s hockey team in Montreal and Castleton State College’s men’s hockey team in Vermont. Prior to joining Medisys, Dr. Delaney practiced in Las Vegas, Nevada with United Healthcare.

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Understanding one’s risks for certain types of common diseases, and how one’s personal habits and lifestyle choices can help prevent some of these medical conditions constitutes a wise first step along the path of healthy living. With Father’s Day and Men’s Health Week around the corner, this is a good time to reflect on men’s health and what that really means. Let’s have a look at some of the issues men are faced with in terms of their risks of developing certain medical conditions and common diseases.

For starters, men are more likely to develop high blood pressure, heart disease, cancer and to become dependent on alcohol compared to women, yet on average men seek medical advice 20% less frequently than women. Basically, men are more likely to need medical advice, but less likely to seek it. There are many reasons for this. Other than when they were kids, many have never seen the inside of a doctor’s office.  There is also the fear of a certain procedure that men over the age of 50 know all too well. It’s important to let men know that the physical exam is only a small part of the annual health assessment. That’s why it’s crucial to shed some light on the diseases that are common in men, and the importance of having their health assessed to see how they can modify the risk of getting the disease or diagnosing it early.

The leading causes of death in men are Heart Disease, Cancer and Accidental Death. When a patient comes to the clinic for an annual health assessment, a physician will ask about family history because some diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer or heart disease run in certain families. Your physician will ask about diet and exercise because your risk of developing diabetes and high blood pressure and some cancers can be lowered with regular exercise and proper diet.

The leading cancers in men are prostate, lung and colon cancer.  Prostate cancer can be detected early by looking at your family history, a physical exam and in some cases a blood test. Lung cancer can be avoided by helping smokers quit smoking and early detection can be achieved through physical exam and in some cases lung function tests or CT scans. Colon cancer risk can be determined by looking at family history and tests such as a colonoscopy can actually help prevent colon cancer.

Finally we will also talk about the importance of safety at home, at work and in your automobile. Most people are shocked to hear that accidental death is the third leading cause of death in men. It’s important for you to discuss your workplace, hobbies and activities with your doctor to help identify risks and find ways to manage these risks.

Remember, “small changes can make a big difference.”

  • If you smoke, quit smoking.
  • Be more active. Adults should get about 2 1/2 hours of exercise per week, but we’re all busy, so just getting up off the couch and being more active is a good start.
  • Eat healthy with a variety of fruits and vegetables every day. Limit food and drinks that are high in calories, sugar, salt, fat and alcohol. Our dietitians can help you with that.
  • Sleep 7 to 9 hours per night. Easier said than done, I know. But don’t underestimate the importance of a good night’s sleep.
  • Control your stress.  Sometimes stress can be good. However, it can be harmful when it is severe enough to make you feel overwhelmed and out of control. Take care of yourself. Avoid drugs and alcohol. Find support. Connect socially. Stay active.
  • Finally, see your doctor for regular checkups. It really isn’t that bad!

Dr. David A. Delaney, MDCM, CCFP, FCFP

Dr. David Delaney is a Family Physician who was born and raised in Quebec City. He is a graduate of McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and he completed his residency in the Family Medicine Department of St. Mary’s Hospital in Montreal. Dr. Delaney is Board Certified in Family Medicine in both Canada and the United States. He is a Fellow in Family Medicine with the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

Dr. Delaney has been practicing medicine since 1996 in Canada as well as the United States. He provides high quality Evidence Based Medicine with an emphasis on Preventive Care. His areas of interest include the care and management of complex medical conditions, adolescent medicine and sports medicine. He has extensive experience working in private practice, caring for his patients in both the community and hospital settings, including the intensive care unit.

In addition to his private practice experience, he was the team physician for Concordia University’s women’s hockey team in Montreal and Castleton State College’s men’s hockey team in Vermont. Prior to joining Medisys, Dr. Delaney practiced in Las Vegas, Nevada with United Healthcare.

 

 

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