The secret to slowing aging? An anti-inflammatory diet

Leslie Beck, RD See Bio

Copyright © Leslie Beck, 2015.

Leslie Beck, Registered Dietitian, is the best-selling author of 12 books on nutrition and health, writes a weekly column in The Globe and Mail, and is a regular contributor to CTV News. Based at the Medisys clinic in Toronto, Leslie offers one-on-one diet coaching, personalized meal plans and evidence-based recommendations on the use of nutritional supplements. www.lesliebeck.com

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If you don’t consider your chromosomes when deciding what to eat, it might be time to start. According to a new study published this month in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the foods you eat – and don’t eat – can affect the length of your telomeres, a marker of biological aging.

Shorter telomeres – the protective caps of DNA and protein on the ends of chromosomes – have been associated with coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia, osteoporosis and many types of cancer. Some, but not all, studies have linked shorter telomeres with early death.

Findings from the new study suggest that diet-related inflammation accelerates telomere shortening and that an anti-inflammatory diet puts the brakes on telomere erosion.

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Copyright © Leslie Beck, 2015.

Leslie Beck, Registered Dietitian, is the best-selling author of 12 books on nutrition and health, writes a weekly column in The Globe and Mail, and is a regular contributor to CTV News. Based at the Medisys clinic in Toronto, Leslie offers one-on-one diet coaching, personalized meal plans and evidence-based recommendations on the use of nutritional supplements. www.lesliebeck.com

 

 

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